We reviewed the best caged ceiling fans on the market today. Caged ceiling fans come in a few varieties. They generally offer higher RPM (revolutions per minute) because the fan is able to safely speed up behind its cage. They also tend to be smaller in blade span since they operate inside of a cage, and cages only come so big. You can read more about the best caged ceiling fans in our buyer’s guide below. We hope you enjoy!

  • Airflow: 1580 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 8.23 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 3 speed AC motor
  • Compact design for small rooms
  • Includes 6” downrod

Savoy House Alsace Fan d’Lier creatively combines the functionalities of a chandelier and a fan with elegance. It’s perfect for small living spaces where an average 2374 CFM airflow will suffice. Its Chestnut blades from behind a White Etched light fixture adds an elegance to any room decor. 

You get a handheld remote with easy speed and light controls. It can also control multiple ceiling fans with ease. Otherwise, you can go for a standard light switch that requires no extra wiring. With an over-the-top wind speed factor of 4.28 MPH, the fan throws a good volume of fresh air to the targeted area. But, due to an average airflow capacity, the breeze is not enough to cool down a medium to large size room. However, it’s good to go for any porch, mud room or half bath area. 

Savoy House is a well-known brand for producing ionizing fandeliers. The Alsace Fan d’Lier is a glowing testimony of its clever craftsmanship to elevate any small room decor while meeting the fresh air requirements at the same time. 

  • Airflow: Not Specified Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: Not Specified Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 3 speed AC motor
  • UL Damp rated
  • 1350 Max motor RPM

The Old Havana Ceiling Mount fan comes with Rust blades to perform in outdoor covered areas as well as indoors. This single head style fan features a 0.75 amp AC motor which rotates its blades with a 25 degree blade pitch to produce quality airflow (rated 5 out of 5). 

The fan rotates at its maximum 1350 RPM (revolutions per minute) speed. Thus, you can rest assured of an ample air supply to every corner of your room. As it’s damp rated only, it can’t be exposed to rain directly. However, it’s good to go in covered areas such as balconies and patios. The fan comes with a 3-speed non-reversing rotary control to easily operate it at your ease. 

This model is one of the Fanimations Ernest Hemingway collections. The design idea dates back to an old era when things were handicraft with pride. With Fanimation’s trust of quality attached to it, this old havana fan is an ideal purchase for any home.

  • Airflow: 1471 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: Not Specified Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 3 speed fan motor
  • UL damp rated
  • Low Electrical consumption

This Savoy House Wetherby Caged Ceiling Fan comes with Satin Nickel finished blades and a stylish LED light kit to take you by surprise. The air quality rating is 5 while the average is just 3. It’s airflow quality is decent at 1471 CFM to easily serve the area below its blades. But the bottom line, don’t expect a huge breeze from this caged fan. 

The fan comes with a hand held remote control with three speed controls and a light dimmer function. As it’s UL damp rated, you can install it in your bathrooms or covered outdoors with no direct exposure to rain or snow. It’s 39 CFM/Watt efficiency rating is below average but is not disappointing for small rooms where large ceiling fans won’t fit in. 

Savoy House products are popular to stand the test of time. It’s ceiling fans resonate with old style handmade designs to add a vintage look to any decor. The Savoy House Wetherby Fan Dlier in Satin Nickel is no exception and adds another feather to the company’s cap. 

 

  • Airflow: 1327 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 6.27 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 3 speed motor
  • UL Damp rated
  • Metal safety cages

Matthews Atlas Kaye in Brushed Nickel is a hardwired oscillating wall mount caged fan with a low profile design similar to train cabin fans. So, it can comfortably fit right into any unusual or tight space. The construction is of cast aluminum and heavy stamped steel promises excellent durability. It features metal safety cages (optional) for extra protection. 

The hand balanced metal blades rotate at a max 1445 RPM motor speed to produce a decent airflow for small rooms. It consumes only 28 watts without lights (47 watts with lights) to give you an energy-saving performance. 

Mathews fans are known for their custom applications. You can either choose from the standard finishes available or go for custom orders. For example, you can also order a custom painted finish for this model in Polished Brass, Black Nickel, Brushed Brass, and more. 

  • Airflow: 754 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: Not Specified Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 3 speed AC motor
  • High-speed cooling
  • Reversible motor

Hunter 12″ Indoor Caged Ceiling Fan in Noble Bronze is a wall-mount high-speed cooling fan with a noiseless performance under a $500 budget. Its exclusive SureSpeed technology ensures a strong breeze while the WhisperWind motor keeps the fan quiet. With reversible motor blades, the fan serves both summer and winter. Meaning, it pushes cold air down on forward mode, or pulls hot air up on reverse mode. 

With a 13-degree blade pitch, it creates an even air distribution. The fan comes with a light kit to create a perfect room ambiance. The kit contains dimmable LED bulbs with longer lifespan than traditional ones. You get a wall switch for easy light and speed control. Please note, the fan is for indoor purposes only and is not safe for outdoor or damp locations. 

The Hunter family helped invent the ceiling fan 100 years back and now they are into stylish lighting solutions too. This model in Noble Bronze is a part of its exclusive indoor fan collections crafted to last a lifetime.  

  • Airflow: 941 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: Not Specified Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 6 speed AC motor
  • Supports Voice Command
  • Reversible fan motor

This 23″ Hunter caged ceiling fan is a modern fan with a multi-speed reversible fan motor housed inside a stylish LED light kit. It comes with an energy-efficient AC motor with a decent airflow of 941 CFM. You can control its operation with a handheld remote control (via Bluetooth) or through voice commands via any Android, iOS, or IoT device.

The product supports two mounting options – standard and angled, making it ideal to mount on all types of ceiling design. It features a sleek black body and hangs from a 4.5” downrod included with the package. Its energy-efficient motor and LED lights consume only 16 watts and 28 watts (7 watts each) respectively.  

From decorative fans to adjustable warmwave heaters, Hunter has a unique range of home renovation solutions. This Hunter fan is one of its exclusive caged ceiling fan products designed to last for a long time.

  • Airflow: 5057 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 11.71 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 6 speed DC motor
  • Quiet performance
  • Includes an 8” downrod

The Corona Fandelier in Satin Nickel is a stunning addition to the Maxim Lighting family. The fan features a super-efficient DC motor with built-in noiseless technology. The motor consumes only 32 watts per hour, saving you 75% less electricity at its moderate speed. 

Its 11.71 wind speed factor and 5057 CFM airflow create a strong wind-chill to give you an instant cooling effect the moment you switch it on. The Corona caged ceiling fan comes with a minimalist design with sharp curved blades caged within a stunning LED ring. The dimmable led lights offer 3895 lumen brightness while consuming only 46 watts per hour. You get an 8” downrod to easily maintain the minimum distance from the ceiling.

Maxim Lighting marks its presence in almost every home & office in the USA. Known for durable materials and next-gen technology, its range of ceiling fans, including the Corona caged ceiling fan in Satin Nickel, is a fine example of its quality and splendor.

  • Airflow: 5057 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 11.71 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 6 speed DC Motor
  • Includes a remote control
  • Supports reverse function

The Maxim Counter is a compact & caged indoor fan that features a noiseless DC motor to offer a quiet performance. The fan comes with 3 Satin Nickel finished blades to rotate in 6 different speed modes. It includes a dimmable uplight & downlight capable of delivering 9315 lumens.

With a wind speed factor of 11.71 MPH, the fan produces a decent breeze within a few seconds. Despite its small blade size, the fan surprisingly gives 5057 CFM airflow, twice that of the average figure. Thus it cools you off and circulates  air faster than an average ceiling fan. With this increased wind-chill efficacy, you can raise your thermostat temp by 1 or 2 degrees to easily save on AC bills. 

For 45 years, Maxim Lighting has been leading the industry in North America by adapting modern technology and contemporary design ideas for its products. The Maxim 60003SN counter fan  goes in the same line by featuring an energy-efficient motor inside a Satin Nickel body to complement any modern home decor.

  • Airflow: 1580 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 8.23 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 3 speed AC motor
  • Produces the strongest breeze
  • Includes an 18” downrod

The Taurus Ionizing Fandelier from Savoy House is a combination of ceiling fan and chandelier in a unique style. The crystal kit surrounds an energy-efficient AC fan motor capable of meeting indoor quality air requirements with ease. Inside the crystal kit, it hosts six non-dimmable 13 watt CFL bulbs to offer a bright illumination.  

Its over-the-top 8.23 MPH wind speed factor (avg- 3 MPH) produces the strongest breeze that you can expect from a ceiling fan. But due to its caged design around the blades, you only feel that breeze while directly under it. However, it scores 4 on overall quality rating where the average is about 3. The set comes with a 3-speed remote control with a light On/Off button (non dimming). 

Savoy House is an Atlanta-born company serving the industry for more than 50 years. They produce great designs with high quality product engineering to meet modern lighting demands. In this regard, the Taurus Ionizing Fandelier in Polished Chrome is no exception. It delivers a decent performance and meets all modern design standards. 

  • Airflow: 10340 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 4.66 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 blades, 3 speed AC motor
  • UL Damp Rated
  • Dual Mount options

The Craftmade 19″ Bellows III is an outdoor caged ceiling fan in Aged Bronze texture suitable for any humid environments such as bathrooms, covered balconies, or patios. Its dual mount design makes it installable on flat and angled ceilings. The fan head tilts up to 90° so you can point it at any target of your room or outdoor area. 

You get dual control options. You can either operate it through a conventional wall control with a 360° fan head rotation or with a 3-speed hand-held remote control. Both are included in the package, so you won’t have to purchase anything separately. Apart from Aged Bronze, its body also comes in Silicon Steel to complement any wall decor. 

Craftmade fans have been winning hearts since 1985. Their high quality products always appeal to modern home owners. Just like the 19″ Bellows III model, every product is made up of fine quality materials and repeatedly tested to promise a long lasting performance. 

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A Caged Ceiling Fan Buyer’s Guide: Everything To Know When Buying a Caged Fan.

We have a deep love for ceiling fans and live to help others understand these products as well as we do. That is why we took the time to write a ceiling fan buyers’ guide.

Buying a caged ceiling fan for the first time can be overwhelming. There are many options for fans and each fan has different styles, sizes, functionality, blades, and installation steps. The cages themselves come in different patterns and designs.

Fortunately for you, we have distilled all of the key variables down into an accessible and digestible guide. You can read this guide if you want an in-depth understanding of ceiling fans or you can skim it if you only want to better understand certain aspects of the fan itself. 

This includes how to select a fan to buy, the types and angles of a fan’s blades, the pros and cons of the AC and DC motors that power fans, and how to install the fan on your ceiling. If you follow this guide you can be confident that you are making a well informed buying decision.

We know all things ceiling fans and want to pass on our learnings and insights to help you. 

Most importantly, we know that once you evaluate, select, and install a ceiling fan it will likely remain in place for many years to come. That is because caged ceiling fans can be heavy, expensive, and labor intensive to install. 

What is a caged fan? Why would someone want one?

A caged fan is, as the name implies, is a fan protected by a metal frame. The cage can cover either the entire fan or a portion of it. 

Sometimes lower cages are popular for protecting lighting, especially for those that have kids playing with indoor sports equipment near the fan itself.

In general, the cage is for aesthetics and lightweight protections. For example, if you have birds a cage is a useful safety mechanism.

If you have kids playing sports (flying footballs or baseballs) a cage can protect the glass lighting on the fan as well.

Most cages are made of solid metal or a metal composite.

What is the importance of a caged ceiling fan?

Caged fans provide you an energy efficient way to heat or cool your home or outdoor space.

A central air conditioning system consumes 3 kiloWatts, which is about 36 cents per hour. Running a fan only runs at 30 Watts, equivalent to only a cent per hour. 

This makes fans affordable and energy efficient alternatives that many people love as they are good for you, your wallet, and the environment.

Running a cagedfan that turns off when a certain temperature range is reached is even more affordable.

Take the time to do research now before buying because the switching costs of changing your mind can be high.

Go through this evaluation check-list so that you better understand the types of motors, blades, installation units, and fans that exist. We encourage you to optimize for:

  1. Overall quality: in particular the speed of the motor to optimize for cooling efficacy and quietness.
  2. Aesthetics: in particular ensure that you are happy with how the fan looks, its color, shape, design, and blade count.
  3. Size: select the right size fan for the room you will be placing it in. Larger rooms require larger fans to create strong air flow.

Selecting the location of the caged ceiling fan: Inside or Outside

Most caged ceiling fans are used within the home. Others are for outdoor structures. Before deciding which type of fan to buy, determine where you will place it. Understanding the placement of a ceiling fan will help you select other attributes – like size, speed, and sound – that will enhance your experience with the fan.

Outdoor caged ceiling fans require different electrical strategies and water-proof finishes. The cages need to be rust-proof as well if it will come into contact with sunlight or water (rain, snow).

Please keep this mind throughout the guide as we largely focus our attention and advice to those people who want to install indoor fans.

If placing the caged ceiling fan in an indoor room, measure the size of the room.

Bathrooms tend to be smaller than bedrooms which tend to be smaller than living rooms or kitchens. 

Knowing the approximate size of the room in which the fan will be placed is important. 

Larger fans are best suited to larger rooms as their blades and motors move greater volumes of air.

Ceiling Fan Size Chart

Room (in feet) Cubic Feet/Minute Fan Size
6′ x 6′ 3,000 – 4,500 Shop: 24″ to 36″
10′ x 10′ 4,000 – 5,500 Shop: 37″ to 48″
12′ x 12′ 6,200 – 7,500 Shop: 49″ to 56″
15′ x 15′ 7,000 – 9,000 Shop: 60″ to 72″
Larger 9,000 – 11,000 Shop: 80″ to 99″

The length of the blade of the fan and the size of the room go hand in hand.

In short, if you have a large room, buy a larger fan. The bigger the fan the better.

The common sizes for ceiling fans are 36, 44 and 52 inches, with the large fans having a blade wingspan of 60 inches. 

Of course you can technically go even larger, with the largest recreational home fans having up to 99 inches of wingspan.

99 inches is 8.25 feet. That is a large fan indeed.

Measure the height of the ceiling and allow at least 7 feet and 6 inches of space.

It is wise and safe to place your fan at least 7 feet above your flooring. 

Placing a caged ceiling fan high up protects tall individuals from hitting their head or having their hair caught while the fan is in motion. Fans need to be installed on ceilings and these installation bases take space as well. 

An installation base is adjoined to a downrod, which is a simple piece of metal that the fan is connected to and hangs from. 

The average American ceiling height today is 9 feet (2.7432 meters). This means that the average room can support a fan but with a shorter downrod. 

If you have average sized ceilings you can afford to install no more than 1 foot and 6 inch downrods.

How to measure downrods and base mounts

A caged ceiling fan is composed of fan blades, a downrod, an installation base, and a metal cage that either fits around the entirety of the fan or around portions of the fan (usually the lighting fixtures). 

The installation base attaches to the ceiling. The downrod connects to the base. And the fan itself hangs from the downrod.

Per the measurements mentioned above, the fan must be at least 7 feet and 6 inches above the ground if you have a standard 9 foot ceiling.  

There is one exception: fans placed above beds, where you will not walk, require less height.

Many people enjoy selecting the fit and finish of the downrod as these pieces of metal or plastic come in different colors, shapes, and sizes and compliment the overall fan’s aesthetic.

As a general rule, more expensive ceiling fans enable you to have longer and more customizable downrods. The downdrods tend to be longer – between 6 and 18 inches.

This is for functionality and aesthetics. Cheaper ceiling fans sometimes have very short – or almost nonexistent downrods – because the base and the fan are fused together.

Design and Look: What to Think about a Caged fan’s general aesthetics

A hugely important aspect of a ceiling fan is what it looks like. If you see the fan while lying in bed or while in your living room you will want it to look great.

The base and downrod are not nearly as important as the blades for how a fan looks in a room. 

Blades come in different cuts, lengths, seizes, finishes, colors and of course quantities. 

How many blades should a caged fan have? Do more blades make a fan better?

At a minimum, a caged ceiling fan will have two blades though four or five are certainly more common. 

A two blade fan can be made of one long piece of metal connected at the mid-point or two distinct blades.

Blades add functionality and impact the air flow.

When you look at a caged fan that is turned on, the blades are hard to see. The cage itself is always visible. When the fan is stationary, however, the design and color of the blades will need to align with your preferences for style and decor. 

Fans with four to six blades produce a lower pitch, softer volume noise output. Three blade fans use the air surrounding the fan most efficiently and require the least effort to clean as you have fewer blades and surface area to collect dust. 

The color, material, and quantity of the blades impact how the fan looks and performs. 

Another subtle variable is at play too: the angles of those blades. If the blades are too flat, they won’t whisk through the air and create air flows. We highly advise blades with angles between 12 and 14 degrees. 

Nearly all of the fans we provide you here have angles in that range for optimal air circulation and air flow efficacy.

More than a fan: how a caged fan provides lighting, symmetry, and aesthetic benefits.

Some people buy ceiling fans simply to cool or heat a room. Others buy ceiling fans because they can be elegant and add character to a home. Some fans have lights and others do not.

If you are going to place your caged fan in the center of a room – for example, your living room – you might do so at the expense of a central lighting system. 

For this reason, adding lights to fans is popular. If you add lights you will want to also consider how easy it is to change the bulbs, especially if the fan is very high above your floor.

Cages can cover the entire fan or just a portion, such as each individual light.

LED, Halogen, and Fluorescent lighting options are available on all fans that have integrated lighting.

Control Your Environment: Noise and Air Flow

Fans without lights produce two types of energy outputs when they are on: noise and air-flow. Both will impact your experience with the fan. Fans with lights also produce illumination as an energy output.

Firstly, noise is a byproduct of any fan. The rotation of the blades and the motor can cause distinct sounds. Larger motors produce more power and, as a result, can generate more noise.

The good news is that noise can be mitigated. 

Motors that are built from higher quality and durable screws, armature, bearings, windings, and rotors are more expensive. 

Cheaper cagedfans have motors that usually produce more noise as a byproduct. 

If you want a quieter fan, buy a more expensive one. You won’t regret it.

Please pay particular attention to this when considering which type of fan you will place in different rooms in your home. If you are considering a bedroom ceiling fan, it is prudent to optimize for minimal sound. 

People tend to care less about noise when a fan is in a garage or bathroom.

The second type of energy output is air-flow.

Fans can not only cool rooms, they can also heat rooms and reduce air moisture.

They substitute central cooling or work in conjunction with air conditioning. 

Fans do not lower air temperatures. They produce air flows and circulation which can in turn create the effect of a windchill. 

The wind chill temperature is how cold people feel. The air flow, which leads to evaporative cooling (deratification), is generated by the ceiling fan.  

If you are using a fan for general room cooling, you will want a fan that accelerates the heat loss from exposed skin. 

Put simply, you will want a fan that generates significant air-flows point downwards and towards the center of the room.

Air Flow Deep Dive: Cubic Feet per Minute

Air flow is the volume of air that is produced by the fan. 

The most common way to measure air flow is Cubic Feet per Minute (or CFM). 

All of the fans we review have a CFM rating so that you can easily compare how much air that each fan produces. 

The average CFM is around 5,000. 

For nearly all non-industrial use-cases, like your home bedroom, kitchen, living room, or garage, a CFM of 6,000-7,000 is optimal. 

At this rate you will be left feeling cooler without greatly enhancing your energy bill or having papers strewn all over the place from the powerful wind currents that larger fans produce.

You might also see a measurement similar to CFM which is air (or wind) Miles Per Hour. 

Much like measuring the speed at which one drives, a fan can have its air speed measured too. 

Nearly all fans produce between 3 and 5 Mile Per Hour air flows. Naturally, the higher the MPH, the stronger the air flows.

Controlling Your Fan and Your Energy Output for Efficiency

Mobile apps and the internet have changed how we communicate, manage, and control various technologies. 

Caged ceiling fans are no exception. 

Ceiling fans are well suited for management by a digital switch, remote, or mobile app because you can power the fans on or off (or even alter the speed) from afar. 

A connected fan is controlled via a remote control or smartphone. In contrast, less expensive and simpler fans are controlled via a manual switch.

Lastly, some caged ceiling fans are controlled by pull chains.

While chains are usually made long enough for all users to reach them, please keep in mind that this can cause discomfort or annoyance on high ceilings or fans that need to be frequently turned on or off.

If you plan on installing your fan over 9 feet above the ground, you should buy a fan that can be controlled digitally.

All ceiling fans can create air-flows bi-direactionally. 

Usually a simple switch exists on the fan’s motor or external base that enables you to change the direction in which the blades rotate. 

Changing the directional air propulsion is critical during the winter months. 

Rather than have air convected from the center of the room for cooling, you will want air to move from the blades horizontally down through the walls. 

Lateral air-flow is used for heating rooms and maintaining central warmth while reducing your energy bill.

Choosing the right ceiling fan direction

How you control your caged ceiling fan is correlated with how much energy your fan uses. Will you leave it running all the time? Or will you use smart logic to power it down after a certain amount of time?

We have gone above and beyond to think about fans not just as cooling mechanisms but as a tool that can help you save money while lowering your ecological footprint. These efforts will, most importantly, save you money.

Let me explain further.

When you use central cooling or air conditioners, you are physically reducing the temperature in a room. 

An air conditioner sucks air into its ducts through a vent. This air cools the gas in the evaporator and as the heat is removed from the air, it is cooled. Cool air then flows into your room.

This process is energy intensive and expensive.

In contrast, a ceiling fan does not cool the room or remove heat. Rather, it moves air around which creates the feeling of cooling. Actual cooling is not occurring. Less energy out means less energy in. And in total this means a lower energy bill.

What A Caged Ceiling Lan Looks Like To You and Others

This guide provides ample information pertaining to how a ceiling fan works and things you should be aware of before buying one or many fans for your home. 

What we have not discussed in great depth is how a caged ceiling fan looks and the importance of design aesthetics. 

A fan will need to fit aesthetically into your room and, as a result, you should think about material (wood, metal, plastic), color, and design patterns. Some questions to reflect on:

  • Is the room light or dark? Is it naturally well lit or does it require lots of electrical light?

If your ceiling fan is going in the center of your living room, for example, you will likely want a fan with built-in lighting. This is because many living rooms have existing fixture hardware and wiring.

  • Do you want a smart fan that connects with your digital applications and services (Google Home, Nest Apple Siri, Amazon Alexa)?

If you control other aspects of your home – like the temperature and humidity – via smart apps, you might want to add a ceiling fan as another connected Internet of Things device. Likewise if you have high ceilings and plan to install a fan that you can’t easily reach by hand. 

Smart fans can be controlled via your phone, tablet, or voice, and these controls will make turning them on or off easier.

  • What color do you want the caged fan to be? What style finish do you want for the cage?

Sleek and minimalist fans have fewer blades. These fans, made of lightweight metal, have universal white, grey, or black finishes. Most cages are black, but sometimes you can find lighter color cages.

Where to buy a caged ceiling fan?

Caged ceiling fans are heavy and can be difficult to fit in a car or to transport yourself unless you have a large vehicle or flat-bed truck. Given this, it makes a lot of sense to have your fan shipped to you so that it arrives ready for home assembly.

You can self-install a ceiling fan. This work requires moderate technical skills and physical strength. This is because you will need to install not only the fan (the blades) but you will need to connect the fan’s base to the ceiling and its electrical fixture hardware and wiring.

How much does a caged ceiling fan cost? What impacts the price of a fan?

Caged ceiling fans range in price from $75 on the cheap-end to over $2,000 on the high-end. There are several reasons why the range in price is so large.

A caged ceiling fan, made of plastic instead of more durable wood or metal, is cheaper.

Additionally, less expensive caged fans have weaker motors. This means that they are capable of producing less air flow or have smaller Cubic Feet per Minute scores.

More expensive fans are akin to those you would experience at a resort or high end hotel. A ceiling fan over $1,200 will likely come packed with high tech solutions built-in. 

These fans will enable you to:

  1. Program the fan based on motion, temperature, or humidity. 
  2. Turn the fan on or off based on preset logic or rules for maximum physical comfort. 
  3. Enjoy very efficient and quiet DC motors that have multi-decade support and lifetime expectations.

Moreover, these caged pricer fans come with app based (smart phone, iPad) mobile management and remote controls. 

It is common for expensive ceiling fans to come with mount options so that you can install a panel adjacent to your light switch. These wall mounts enable you to control not only the fan (on/off) but also the fan speed and direction. 

Cheaper caged fans do not come with these in depth level of controls or sophisticated management features. 

And that is ok. Simplicity might be what you crave. 

Cheaper caged fans cool rooms as well and can be easily turned on/off with pull chains.

Less expensive fans (in the $100-$300 price point) still come with energy-efficient dimmable lightbulbs.

AC vs DC fans: Understanding a fan’s power source

Most inexpensive caged fans leverage AC motors.

Although AC motors are more powerful than DC motors, they typically are less efficient and are not as good at using their energy output. 

This can cause additional noise (thereby making it harder to sleep if that fan is in your bedroom). 

When buying a caged fan, please take a moment to see the Power Source listed in the fan’s essential product information that all suppliers provide. If you buy a fan with an AC motor, it will be louder.

As a result, we highly advise buying a DC powered fan if you will be sleeping near it.

AC motors are durable and longer lasting. While this might seem positive, DC motors are better (and therefore more costly). 

DC motors are simpler to install into the fan’s base, have high startup power, and have a faster response time. 

This means that time will be shortened from when you switch the “on” button to when the fan is accelerating to cool your room.

Although more expensive, ceiling fans with DC motors consume 70% less power which will enable you to save money over time as you pay less to power them.

Where to place the caged ceiling fan: voltage and flush mounting

Many people place their ceiling fans in the center of a room or above a bed. This is to maximize comfort and the impact of the fan’s air flows.

A centrally placed ceiling fan also creates room symmetry.

Voltage is the pressure from an electrical circuit’s power, and the most common electrical outlet in any home is a 110 volt. If you live in the United States, you will need to select a fan that complies with this voltage limit. 

Luckily for you, nearly all off-the-shelf ceiling fans support this standard. 

When installing a ceiling fan you will need to get a few things absolutely right. We have done this many times for ourselves, our family, friends, and of course our clients.

Firstly, some ceiling fans support flush mount integrations. Flush mount fans sit directly against the ceiling and point downwards. These fans are typically useful for cooling a small room. 

Not all ceiling fans are flush mountable. 

This means that they will hang lower from the ceiling. If you buy a fan that cannot be flush mounted, please ensure that the lower point of the fan is at least 7 feet and six inches from the ground.

Additionally, ensure that the weight bearing load of the ceiling can support the fan. 

Similar to voltage, this should be routine in many homes. 

But it is worth investigating because you don’t want to buy a fan just to see it unable to stay upright. 

For most fans that we review and see our clients deploy, a ceiling must be able to support approximately 35 pounds of downward pressure.

Buyer’s Guide Summary: Bringing It All Together

Buying a caged ceiling fan for the first time does not need to be overwhelming.

Simply follow this guide to evaluate and buy the fan that fits best in your room and adds the most value in your life.

Don’t get too bogged down in the details. If nothing else, pick a caged ceiling fan that looks great, fits well within your room, and that is priced according to your budget.

If the fan is going into your bedroom, it is worth spending a bit more for a quitter product – you won’t regret it.

If you have kids, indoor flying objects (read: pets), or outside animals (read: birds), a cage is great for ease of mind, simplicity, protection, and reducing the risk of stuff getting into the fan or breaking lights.