What is a garage ceiling fan? It is essentially a ceiling fan is waterproof, durable, and built specifically to withstand the potentially harsher environments of a garage. Of particular importance, garage ceiling fans have damp ratings. This means that that these can handle a bit of moisture or dust, making them perfect for a garage setting that might be used for parking a car, storing goods, or doing home office projects.

We kept this in mind and reviewed the best ceiling fans that carry a damp rating so that you can focus on what matters: cooling your home garage.

We also selected long blade spans as most garages tend to be larger than your average room within a house. In the U.S. garages are usually the width of one or two cars. Therefore, a fan with larger blades can add more value here in ways that it can’t within a home.

Some garage’s don’t need ceiling fans. Rather, they need floor fans or better insulation. Others need windows for enhanced circulation.

If you are looking to cool your garage, the fans outlined here are all candidates to help. They are robust, reliable, water-resistant, aesthetically pleasing, and generate strong air-flows.

We hope you enjoy our top picks for the best garage ceiling fan. Read our buyer’s guide at the bottom of the page for even more information on all things garage ceiling fans.

  • Airflow: 11,779 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 4.03 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 6 speed DC moto
  • Exceptional airflow and wind
  • Bluetooth and WiFi enabled

The Modern Forms Aviator is a high performance (11,779 CFM against a 5,000 CFM avg) all-weather ceiling fan. It can easily handle rain, heat, sleet and snow and can be easily washed off with a hose. Thus, it makes a perfect attic ceiling fan or an outdoor fan. The 70” aerodynamic blades produce a strong and effective cooling breeze across a large room. The powerful DC motor will run smooth and quiet for years while saving you on energy bills over time. 

The optional LED Lights have a twist lock system for easy installation. A mouth blown triplex glass gives a brighter illumination. The WiFi-ready fan comes with a full function Bluetooth wall control that improves the range at which ordinary control works. The remote can also control multiple fans which is terrific.

The Modern Forms fans are the new leader in the ceiling fan technology. Their fans, like this model, work with almost all of the smart devices, both Android and Apple.  The Aviator series is top notch in style as well as quality to meet both indoor and outdoor requirements.

  • Airflow: 7244 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.26 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 6 speed DC motor
  • Smart Features
  • UL WET rated

The Mordern Forms Morpheus Ceiling fan is fully smart and WiFi ready. The fan is compatible with Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa, Nest, Ecobee and Samsung SmartThings to run on voice commands. You can either go wireless or use a wall control that features 6 speeds and a full range light dimmer. The control requires only a single hot wire to install.

Each fan includes an energy saving dimmable LED light. The DC motor present is EnergyStar qualified that saves more power than an average AC ceiling fan. The model is UL rated to use in outdoor wet locations for both covered and uncovered areas. Even exposure to heavy rains won’t damage its exteriors. Thus, it can function as a garage ceiling fan without any cause for concern.

The Modern Forms fans are fairly new in the market with competitive and over the edge technology in the fan industry. For homes and offices that want technologically savvy interiors, the Morpheus ceiling fans will be the ideal bet.

  • Airflow: 5878 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.4 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 3 speed DC motor
  • Rated for damp locations
  • Optional light fixtures

The Modern Fan Solus in Gloss White is customizable with multiple blades and light options. The fans are well designed and can withstand harsh weather conditions. Thus, serving as a garage ceiling fan is no trouble at all for it! They are UL rated for both indoor and outdoor lounge and living areas. Though you get a primary 3 speed wall control, other control options are also available.

The fan has sleek cage-like grillwork and contemporary lines to amplify your existing room decor. This model produces the best cooling breeze at 3.4 MPH, even if you are not sitting directly under its blades. With an airflow of 5878 CFM you can expect even distribution of air within a room whether outdoor or indoor.

The Modern Fans Company have pioneered in creating the latest design ceiling fans with most advanced features. They also commit on quality within reasonable price rates. The Solus range was released in 2014 and still is one of their bestsellers for its impeccable performance.

  • Airflow: 5035 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 2.91 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 3 speed DC motor
  • Stylish light fixtures
  • Energy Efficient

The Modern Fan Pharos is a contemporary ceiling fan with attractive light fixtures. It has a single light fixture with frosted opal glass. The frosted glass gives a diffused ethereal luminance to your interiors. The fixture uses 3×40 watt Candelabra bulbs that can be used in both dry and damp locations. The average airflow at 5035 CFM is ideal for areas with minimum cooling requirements. While this makes for a great garage fan, it’s beautiful design is also a beautiful addition to almost any small to medium size room in the house.

The fan features a 188mm x 15mm DC Motor that saves energy and works smoothly under power fluctuations. The 3 speed hand held remote control can be used for both halogen and incandescent lamps. It also comes with a wall hanging bracket for better convenience. However, the remote cannot be used to control more than one ceiling fan. 

The Modern Fans are aimed for the modern contemporary homes. The company stresses over better energy efficiency and design value for all its models. The Pharos is one of the most affordable ceiling fans they offer that has both style and terrific functionality amongst rest fans in the market.

  • Airflow: 5570 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: Not Specified Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 6 speed DC motor
  • Retro colorful design
  • High energy efficiency

The Craftmade Fluid ceiling fan will turn heads. The fan is available in four fabulous designs and colors to amplify your indoor or outdoor space. The 54” blades are twisted to give it a retro look and will be perfect for small intimate spaces.

The DC Motor not only makes it super efficient but also proves to be durable in long term. The Fluid is so cost-effective because it uses only 38.7 watts per hour at high speed. The overall efficiency is 153CFM/Watt which makes the fan three times more efficient than average AC ceiling fans.

Craftmade fans are known to create funky and sometimes over the top designs that immediately uplifts the décor of the entire room. The Fluid series is very much inspired by the retro décor with the use of pastel colors and seamless designs. The fans are more geared towards aesthetics and it makes the model highly sought-after amongst buyers. 

  • Airflow: 7301 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.71 Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 6 speed DC motor
  • Frosted glass light diffuser
  • Rated for outdoor damp

The Monte Carlo Lily Ceiling Fan comes with rubberized white blades that allows less friction and adds more longevity to the device. The blades come at a 14 degree blade pitch to produce airflow of the highest rating (5/5) among fans in the same price range. An integrated LED Fixture encased in a clear frosted glass diffuser doubles its beauty.

The fixture illumination is not harsh due to the diffuser and creates a soft focus. The 12 Watt LED fan serves its purpose for both dry and damp locations. With 7301 CFM airflow, the fan scores above the average to save upto 40% on your AC bills. The fan features a 120mmx25mm DC motor to save you even more energy. It comes with a damp rating so it can be used in any garage without cause for concern. 

Founded in 1996, Monte Carlo emphasizes on fashion-forward and trend-inspired solutions for homes and offices. The Lily ceiling fan series is one of their most loved and affordable fans that never disappoints.

  • Airflow: 5535 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.2 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 4 Blades, 3 speed DC motor
  • High energy efficiency
  • Includes 4” downrod

The Modern Fan Flute Ceiling comes with various light fixture options to give you an upper edge customization. The vertical orientation of the die-cast body can house either a 26- watt compact fluorescent lamp or a regular incandescent bulb. The fluorescent light is ideal for long time usage as each lamp can last for at least 10,000 hours. 

The fan utilizes an energy efficient DC Motor. Even the fluorescent light fixtures consume 75% less energy than an equivalent incandescent light bulb. The fan operates by a 3 speed wall control while other types of control options are also available. The 52” blade span is ideal for small to medium sized rooms. It is damp rated to work perfectly in any garage.

The Modern Fans create versatile transitional designs to suit any setting. The Flute ceiling fans is one of their highly energy efficient and universally flattering designs that can fit into any space.

  • Airflow: 4998 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 2.89 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 31 speed DC motor
  • Bluetooth Enabled
  • Energy Star Qualified item

The Fanimation distinction ceiling fan comes in varying blade spans ranging from 54”- 72” to suit different types of room space. With customized blades and light fixtures, it suits any decor. It is a traditional extra large fan that serves very large spaces, hallways, porticos and balconies, and of course, garages.

The model is EnergyStar qualified and damp rated to suit both outdoor and indoor. The high efficient DC motor coupled with 14-degree blade pitch gives an average airflow (4998 CFM) while saving your AC bills. You get a 31-speed Bluetooth remote along with other control options. You can also download the Fansync app on your smart device to control this fan via Bluetooth.

The Fanimation Company is a gold standard in the fan industry. Their designs target every décor and come budget-friendly. The Distinction model is a great buy for any type of room setting which makes it even more highly sought-after amongst home owners. 

  • Airflow: 6321 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.43 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 6 speed DC motor
  • Smart features
  • UL WET Rated

The Modern Forms Aviator comes with smart features and exceeds the current efficiency standards. You can operate the fan from anywhere with its WiFi smart app which has learning capabilities to adapt to your lifestyle needs. It can connect with various home automation systems via Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Samsung Smart Things, Nest and Ecobee.

Its super efficient DC motor consumes 70% less electricity than a typical AC motor fan. The fan consumes only 30watts/hour even at high speeds, saving a lot on AC bills. The model also includes an energy saving dimmable LED Light. With an above-average airflow of 6321 CFM, it is an excellent choice to provide a decent breeze across a large room. 

The Modern Forms is a fairly new member in the fan industry yet creates fashionable designs with most advanced features. Its Aviator model is a far cry from the conventional fans we knew but only better.

  • Airflow: 8593 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.43 Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 31 speed DC motor
  • EnergyStar Qualified
  • Includes downrod

The Fanimation Custom Wrap is a sophisticated garage ceiling fan with multiple blade finish and motor combinations. The light kits are also sold separately to make the customization even more flexible.  It is EnergyStar qualified to save energy even when used in multiple rooms for long hours.

The high efficiency DC motor performs well both indoors and outdoors. You can operate by a hand-held remote, a wall control or a smartphone. To enable smart control via Echo or Google Home, you need to purchase the WFR receiver separately. It’s also compatible with Ecobee, Nest, Smart Things and others. 

Fanimation is one of the most popular fan making companies in the market known for its energy-efficient products. Its Custom Wrap model is available in two variable blade sizes ranging from 44” to 84” to suit every interior. It’s an ideal purchase to complement your Smart Home.

  • Airflow: 7160 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.23 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 6 speed DC motor
  • UL Wet rated
  • Includes 4 ½” downrod

Modern Forms Wynd comes with 60” all-weather blades and stainless steel body to withstand harsh outdoor climatic conditions. This is a smart and WiFi ready model that can be operated through a wall control, WiFi touch panel or a mobile application. It is also compatible with smart voice assistants such as Google Nest, Amazon Alexa, SmartThings, Ecobee, etc. 

It is UL rated for indoor and outdoor performance including rain and snow. Moreover, you can easily clean it off using a hose. The DC motor inside saves 70% of your AC bills and delivers air at a terrific airflow of 7160 CFM speed. Its efficiency rating is 211 CFM/Watt, ensuring you more CFM per less watts consumed. 

Modern Forms fans are best known for their energy-efficient DC motors which save energy without compromising its quality delivery. With a quality rating of five out of five, Modern Forms Wynd clearly meets your air requirements while amplifying your existing décor at the same time. 

  • Airflow: 4975 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 2.88 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 4 Blades, 3 speed DC motor
  • Flush mount configuration
  • 5/5 quality rating

This Ball Flush Mount fan is a Ceiling Huggers style model from Modern Fan that is perfect for any low-ceiling environment. The teardrop shape gives it a graceful look and a connectedness to the space. The aluminum color blades blend well with any optional light fixture to aid your room décor. 

Inside of it present is a 153mm× 18mm DC motor to rotate 5” blades to produce a decent airflow. It is UL rated for indoor and outdoor damp locations but not for wet areas. The model comes with a basic hand held remote control to manage speed. However, it can control only one fan at a time.   

Modern Fan offers five years limited motor warranty on all its fan motor which makes the company highly sought-after in the market. This Ball Flush model impresses further with its decent performance at a price much lower than costly counterparts. 

  • Airflow: 7579 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.41 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 4 speed AC motor
  • Fan slide wall control
  • Energy Star qualified

Emerson Loft Ceiling Fan flaunts a barbeque black body and same color ABS blades to amplify your indoor and outdoor décor. You can install it either in a dry or damp location. With 60” blade span and 190 RPM maximum speed, the AC motor inside produces air to blow your socks off. The airflow quality is terrific at 7579 CFM against 5000 average. This beast of a fan is perfect for cooling down a large garage with its damp rating and large blade span.

You can expect a decent breeze under its blades as the wind speed factor is just above-average (3.41 MPH). Despite running on an AC motor, it is Energy Star qualified (Including the lights) to save you up to 70% energy similar to a DC motor fan. 

Emerson’s pioneer budget-friendly product designs always impress users both indoor and outdoor.  However this model comes with brushed nickel finish for indoor and damp applications only. Nevertheless, it’s a best budget-buy fan under $300 category. 

  • Airflow: 5670 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.28 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 3 Blades, 6 speed AC motor
  • Includes 6" Downrod
  • Low electrical usage

Minka Aire Simple in Coal flaunts ABS all-weather blades and a super efficient DC motor to offer bespoke performance under wet conditions. The motor runs at six different speeds at a maximum 191 RPM to deliver above-average airflow of 5670 CFM. It’s perfect for a large garage.

As it runs on a DC motor, it consumes only 33 watts per hour thereby saving you 70% of your energy bill compared to an AC model. You can control with a remote that has forward and reverse functions but no light dimmer. The optional LED light kit gives you a full scope of customization to meet your design requirements.  

Most Minka Aire fans are designed to withstand tough weather conditions including snow and rain. The 52” Simple in Coal model is also UL Wet rated and can perform well in dry, damp or wet location, including rain and snow.  Indeed, it is one of the best-buy fan models under $350 in the market. 

  • Airflow: 8270 CFM Airflow quantifies the amount of air a ceiling fan delivers and is measured in CFM which stands for cubic feet per minute. CFM measurements are taken when a fan is on high speed, then that number is divided by the watts used. This means that the higher the CFM, the more efficient the fan, and the more air it moves.
  • Windspeed: 3.73 MPH Wind speed from a ceiling fan is sort of the same as the breeze between the two buildings that created the wind tunnel effect. To feel the more powerful wind speed you will need to be directly underneath the ceiling fan, or at least very nearby and not far from the tips of the fan blades.
  • 5 Blades, 3 speed DC motor
  • High energy efficiency
  • Durable body

The Monte Carlo Cyclone Ceiling Fan is UL Wet rated. Thus, it is an ultimate choice for outdoor damp and wet applications. It’s perfect for a garage. Even exposure to heavy rain, snow and wind won’t hamper its body and performance. With a powerful 212mm x 25mm DC motor inside, it moves air 8270 CFM airflow (Avg is 5000 CFM) to give you an instant cooling effect.

Its efficiency rating is 100 CFM/Watt which will save you money on your energy bills in the long term. Operating the fan is very simple with a 3 speed pull chain. In a transitional style, this fan also offers optional light fixtures to amplify your décor at your preferred color temperature.

Monte Carlo has served for decades now paving way to innovative designs. Their fans are made to last for generations just like the Cyclone ceiling model. With little maintenance and better efficiency, this fan is a sure hit.

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A Ceiling Fan Buyer’s Guide: Everything To Know When Buying a Garage Ceiling Fan.

We have a deep love for ceiling fans and live to help others understand these products as well as we do. That is why we took the time to write a garage ceiling fan buyers’ guide.

Buying a garage ceiling fan for the first time can be overwhelming. There are many options for fans and each fan has different styles, sizes, functionality, blades, and installation steps.

Also, what you do in your garage (park a car, auto maintenance, removal of fumes, etc) will impact the size, power, and type of fan you should buy. We will cover these in the sections to come.

Fortunately for you, we have distilled all of the key variables down into an accessible and digestible guide. You can read this guide if you want an in-depth understanding of garage ceiling fans or you can skim it if you only want to better understand certain aspects of the fan itself. 

This includes how to select a fan to buy, the types and angles of a fan’s blades, the pros and cons of the AC and DC motors that power garage fans, and how to install the fan on your ceiling. If you follow this guide you can be confident that you are making a well informed buying decision.

We know all things ceiling fans and want to pass on our learnings and insights to help you. 

Most importantly, we know that once you evaluate, select, and install a ceiling fan it will likely remain in place for many years to come. That is because ceiling fans can be heavy, expensive, and labor intensive to install. 

What is a garage ceiling fan? Where should it be installed?

A garage fan is a type of fan specifically used to create air-flows in a garage. These fans have special attributes, including where they are placed within a garage, their finishes, and the size of their blades.

Specifically, you will want to follow these steps when installing and conceptualizing how and where to place your garage ceiling fan:

  1. You want any fan in your garage to blow inwards and at an upper angle in order to circulate fumes, dust, etc.
  2. The fan should be located either at the center of the garage or closest to the garage door. If located closest to the door, have the wind blow outwards.
  3. Ceiling fans for garages must be damp-rated. Damp-rated fans do not lose their looks when they are exposed to moisture as well as sunlight.
  4. Damp-rated fans can get slightly wet (through air moisture) but should not come into contact with direct water streams (i.e. snow or rain).
  5. Most garage ceiling fans have blades of at least 50 inches.

Running a garage fan that turns off when a certain temperature range is reached makes these fans even more affordable.

Take the time to do research now before buying because the switching costs of changing your mind can be high.

Go through this evaluation check-list so that you better understand the types of motors, blades, installation units, and fans that exist. We encourage you to optimize for:

  1. Overall quality: in particular the speed of the motor to optimize for cooling efficacy and quietness.
  2. Aesthetics: in particular ensure that you are happy with how the fan looks, its color, shape, design, and blade count.
  3. Size: select the right size fan for your garage. Single car garages require at least 49 inch blades. Two car grades require at least 70 inches.

Ceiling Fan Size Chart

Room (in feet) Cubic Feet/Minute Fan Size
12′ x 12′ 6,200 – 7,500 Shop: 49″ to 56″
15′ x 15′ 7,000 – 9,000 Shop: 60″ to 72″
Larger 9,000 – 11,000 Shop: 80″ to 99″

The length of the blade of the fan and the size of the room go hand in hand.

In short, if you have a large garage, buy a larger fan. The bigger the fan the better.

Of course you can technically go even larger, with the largest recreational home fans having up to 99 inches of wingspan.

99 inches is 8.25 feet. That is a large fan indeed.

Measure the height of the ceiling and allow at least 7 feet and 6 inches of space.

It is wise and safe to place your fan at least 7 feet above your flooring. This will give you at least one foot of space between the roof of your car and the fan.

If you have a roof-rack or additional add ones to the top of your car take this into consideration.

Placing a ceiling fan high up protects tall individuals from hitting their head or having their hair caught while the fan is in motion. And it protects your car. Fans need to be installed on ceilings and these installation bases take space as well. 

An installation base is adjoined to a downrod, which is a simple piece of metal that the fan is connected to and hangs from. 

The average American garage ceiling height today is 9 feet (2.7432 meters). This means that the average room can support a fan but with a shorter downrod. 

If you have average sized ceilings you can afford to install no more than 1 foot and 6 inch downrods.

How to measure downrods and base mounts

A ceiling fan is composed of fan blades, a downrod, and an installation base. 

The installation base attaches to the ceiling. The downrod connects to the base. And the fan itself hangs from the downrod.

Per the measurements mentioned above, the fan must be at least 7 feet and 6 inches above the ground if you have a standard 9 foot ceiling.  

Many people enjoy selecting the fit and finish of the downrod as these pieces of metal or plastic come in different colors, shapes, and sizes and compliment the overall fan’s aesthetic.

As a general rule, more expensive ceiling fans enable you to have longer and more customizable downrods. The downdrods tend to be longer – between 6 and 18 inches.

This is for functionality and aesthetics. Cheaper ceiling fans sometimes have very short – or almost nonexistent downrods – because the base and the fan are fused together.

Design: What a garage ceiling fan looks like

A hugely important aspect of a ceiling fan is what it looks like. This is true in a garage where you will want the fan to provide strong air flow but also look nice above your cars.

An important part of what a garage fan looks like is the blades.

Blades come in different cuts, lengths, seizes, finishes, colors and of course quantities. 

How many blades should the fan have?

At a minimum, a garage ceiling fan will have two blades though four or five are certainly more common. 

A two blade fan can be made of one long piece of metal connected at the mid-point or two distinct blades.

Blades add functionality and impact the air flow.

When you look at a fan that is turned on, the blades are hard to see. When the fan is stationary, however, the design and color of the blades will need to align with your preferences for style and decor. 

Fans with four to six blades produce a lower pitch, softer volume noise output. Three blade fans use the air surrounding the fan most efficiently and require the least effort to clean as you have fewer blades and surface area to collect dust. 

The color, material, and quantity of the blades impact how the fan looks and performs. 

Another subtle variable is at play too: the angles of those blades. If the blades are too flat, they won’t whisk through the air and create air flows. We highly advise blades with angles between 12 and 14 degrees. 

Nearly all of the fans we provide you here have angles in that range for optimal air circulation and air flow efficacy.

More than a fan: how a garage fan provides lighting, symmetry, and aesthetic benefits.

Some people buy ceiling fans simply to cool or heat their garages. Others buy these ceiling fans because they can be elegant and add character to a parking or indoor work area. Some fans have lights and others do not.

If you are going to place your fan in the center of a garage you might do so at the expense of a central lighting system. 

For this reason, adding lights to garage fans is popular. If you add lights you will want to also consider how easy it is to change the bulbs, especially if the fan is very high above your floor.

LED, Halogen, and Fluorescent lighting options are available on all fans that have integrated lighting.

Control Your Environment: Noise and Air Flow

Fans without lights produce two types of energy outputs when they are on: noise and air-flow. Both will impact your experience with the fan. Fans with lights also produce illumination as an energy output.

Firstly, noise is a byproduct of any fan. The rotation of the blades and the motor can cause distinct sounds. Larger motors produce more power and, as a result, can generate more noise.

The good news is that noise can be mitigated. If you are using your garage for work (i.e. woodworking, painting, home exercise etc) you might care about noise, hence why we are flagging this.

Motors that are built from higher quality and durable screws, armature, bearings, windings, and rotors are more expensive. 

Cheaper fans have motors that usually produce more noise as a byproduct. If you want a quieter fan, buy a more expensive one. You won’t regret it.

The second type of energy output is air-flow.

Fans can not only cool rooms, they can also heat rooms and reduce air moisture.

They substitute central cooling or work in conjunction with air conditioning. 

Fans do not lower air temperatures. They produce air flows and circulation which can in turn create the effect of a windchill. 

The wind chill temperature is how cold people feel. The air flow, which leads to evaporative cooling (deratification), is generated by the ceiling fan.  

If you are using a fan for general room cooling, you will want a fan that accelerates the heat loss from exposed skin. 

Put simply, you will want a fan that generates significant air-flows point downwards and towards the center of the room.

Air Flow Deep Dive: Cubic Feet per Minute

Air flow is the volume of air that is produced by the fan. 

The most common way to measure air flow is Cubic Feet per Minute (or CFM). 

All of the fans we review have a CFM rating so that you can easily compare how much air that each fan produces. 

The average CFM is around 5,000. 

For nearly all non-industrial use-cases, like a garage, a CFM of 6,000-7,000 is optimal. 

At this rate you will be left feeling cooler without greatly enhancing your energy bill or having papers strewn all over the place from the powerful wind currents that larger fans produce.

You might also see a measurement similar to CFM which is air (or wind) Miles Per Hour. 

Much like measuring the speed at which one drives, a fan can have its air speed measured too. 

Nearly all fans produce between 3 and 5 Mile Per Hour air flows. Naturally, the higher the MPH, the stronger the air flows.

If you are working with strong fumes in your garage (oils, paints, construction gear) select a fan with strong MPH to blow the air out of the garage.

Controlling Your Fan and Your Energy Output for Efficiency

Mobile apps and the internet have changed how we communicate, manage, and control various technologies. 

Garage ceiling fans are no exception. 

Ceiling fans are well suited for management by a digital switch, remote, or mobile app because you can power the fans on or off (or even alter the speed) from afar. 

A connected fan is controlled via a remote control or smartphone. In contrast, less expensive and simpler fans are controlled via a manual switch.

Lastly, some garage ceiling fans are controlled by pull chains.

While chains are usually made long enough for all users to reach them, please keep in mind that this can cause discomfort or annoyance on high ceilings or fans that need to be frequently turned on or off.

If you plan on installing your fan over 9 feet above the ground, you should buy a fan that can be controlled digitally.

All ceiling fans can create air-flows bi-direactionally. 

Usually a simple switch exists on the fan’s motor or external base that enables you to change the direction in which the blades rotate. 

Changing the directional air propulsion is critical during the winter months. 

Rather than have air convected from the center of the room for cooling, you will want air to move from the blades horizontally down through the walls. 

Lateral air-flow is used for heating rooms and maintaining central warmth while reducing your energy bill.

Choosing the right ceiling fan direction

How you control your garage fan is correlated with how much energy your fan uses. Will you leave it running all the time? Or will you use smart logic to power it down after a certain amount of time?

We have gone above and beyond to think about fans not just as cooling mechanisms but as a tool that can help you save money while lowering your ecological footprint. These efforts will, most importantly, save you money.

Let me explain further.

When you use central cooling or air conditioners, you are physically reducing the temperature in a room. 

An air conditioner sucks air into its ducts through a vent. This air cools the gas in the evaporator and as the heat is removed from the air, it is cooled. Cool air then flows into your room.

This process is energy intensive and expensive.

In contrast, a garage ceiling fan does not cool the room or remove heat. Rather, it moves air around which creates the feeling of cooling. Actual cooling is not occurring. Less energy out means less energy in. And in total this means a lower energy bill.

What A Garage Ceiling Fan Looks Like To You and Others

This guide provides ample information pertaining to how a garage ceiling fan works and things you should be aware of before buying one or many fans for your garage. 

What we have not discussed in great depth is how a garage fan looks and the importance of design aesthetics. 

A fan will need to fit aesthetically into your room and, as a result, you should think about material (wood, metal, plastic), color, and design patterns. Some questions to reflect on:

  • Is the garage light or dark? Is it naturally well lit or does it require lots of electrical light?

If your garage ceiling fan is going in the center of the garage, for example, you will likely want a fan with built-in lighting. This is because many garages have existing fixture hardware and wiring.

  • Do you want a smart fan that connects with your digital applications and services (Google Home, Nest Apple Siri, Amazon Alexa)?

If you control other aspects of your home – like the temperature and humidity – via smart apps, you might want to add a ceiling fan as another connected Internet of Things device. Likewise if you have high ceilings and plan to install a fan that you can’t easily reach by hand. 

Smart fans can be controlled via your phone, tablet, or voice, and these controls will make turning them on or off easier.

  • What color do you want the fan? What style finish do you want?

Sleek and minimalist fans have fewer blades. These fans, made of lightweight metal, have universal white, grey, or black finishes. 

Where to buy a garage ceiling fan?

Garage ceiling fans are usually larger and therefore heavy. Thus, they can be difficult to fit in a car or to transport yourself unless you have a large vehicle or flat-bed truck. Given this, it makes a lot of sense to have your fan shipped to you so that it arrives ready for home assembly.

You can self-install a ceiling fan. This work requires moderate technical skills and physical strength. This is because you will need to install not only the fan (the blades) but you will need to connect the fan’s base to the ceiling and its electrical fixture hardware and wiring.

How much do garage ceiling fans cost? What impacts the price of a fan?

Ceiling fans range in price from $75 on the cheap-end to over $1,300 on the high-end. There are several reasons why the range in price is so large.

A garage ceiling fan, made of plastic instead of more durable wood or metal, is cheaper.

Additionally, less expensive fans have weaker motors. This means that they are capable of producing less air flow or have smaller Cubic Feet per Minute scores.

More expensive garage ceiling fans are akin to those you would experience at a resort or high end hotel. A ceiling fan over $1,200 will likely come packed with high tech solutions built-in. 

These fans will enable you to:

  1. Program the fan based on motion, temperature, or humidity. 
  2. Turn the fan on or off based on preset logic or rules for maximum physical comfort. 
  3. Enjoy very efficient and quiet DC motors that have multi-decade support and lifetime expectations.

Moreover, these pricer fans come with app based (smart phone, iPad) mobile management and remote controls. 

It is common for expensive garage ceiling fans to come with mount options so that you can install a panel adjacent to your light switch. These wall mounts enable you to control not only the fan (on/off) but also the fan speed and direction. 

Cheaper garage ceiling fans do not come with these in depth level of controls or sophisticated management features. 

And that is ok. Simplicity might be what you crave. 

Cheaper fans cool rooms as well and can be easily turned on/off with pull chains.

Less expensive fans (in the $100-$300 price point) still come with energy-efficient dimmable lightbulbs.

AC vs DC fans: Understanding a fan’s power source

Most inexpensive garage ceiling fans leverage AC motors.

Although AC motors are more powerful than DC motors, they typically are less efficient and are not as good at using their energy output. 

This can cause additional noise (thereby making it harder to sleep if that fan is in your bedroom). 

When buying a fan, please take a moment to see the Power Source listed in the fan’s essential product information that all suppliers provide. If you buy a fan with an AC motor, it will be louder.

As a result, we highly advise buying a DC powered fan if you are working in your garage (as opposed to just parking in it).

AC motors are durable and longer lasting. While this might seem positive, DC motors are better (and therefore more costly). 

DC motors are simpler to install into the fan’s base, have high startup power, and have a faster response time. 

This means that time will be shortened from when you switch the “on” button to when the fan is accelerating to cool your garage.

Although more expensive, ceiling fans with DC motors consume 70% less power which will enable you to save money over time as you pay less to power them.

Where to place the garage ceiling fan: voltage and flush mounting

Many people place their garage ceiling fans in the center of their garages. Others place the fans closer to the door so as to create externally facing air-flows.

A centrally placed ceiling fan also creates room symmetry.

Voltage is the pressure from an electrical circuit’s power, and the most common electrical outlet in any home is a 110 volt. If you live in the United States, you will need to select a fan that complies with this voltage limit. 

Luckily for you, nearly all off-the-shelf ceiling fans support this standard. 

When installing a garage ceiling fan you will need to get a few things absolutely right. We have done this many times for ourselves, our family, friends, and of course our clients.

Firstly, some ceiling fans support flush mount integrations. Flush mount fans sit directly against the ceiling and point downwards. These fans are typically useful for cooling a small room. 

Not all ceiling fans are flush mountable. 

This means that they will hang lower from the ceiling. If you buy a fan that cannot be flush mounted, please ensure that the lower point of the fan is at least 7 feet and six inches from the ground.

Additionally, ensure that the weight bearing load of the ceiling can support the fan. 

Similar to voltage, this should be routine in many homes. 

But it is worth investigating because you don’t want to buy a fan just to see it unable to stay upright. 

For most fans that we review and see our clients deploy, a ceiling must be able to support approximately 35 pounds of downward pressure.

Buyer’s Guide Summary: Bringing It All Together

Buying a garage ceiling fan for the first time does not need to be overwhelming.

Simply follow this guide to evaluate and buy the fan that fits best in your garage and adds the most value in your life.

Don’t get too bogged down in the details. If nothing else, pick a fan that looks great, fits well within your garage, and that is priced according to your budget.

Remember to install the blades last, so that they don’t break. This will be written in every installation manual.